Food Sovereignty Ghana

A grass-roots food advocacy movement of Ghanaians both home and abroad!

February 27, 2020
by admin
0 comments

BREAKING NEWS! #PlantBreedersBill: National Workshop on the Plant Breeders Bill is currently underway…

WhatsApp Image 2020-02-27 at 10.52.33
BREAKING NEWS! #PlantBreedersBill
A two-day National Workshop on the Plant Breeders Bill is currently underway, in Accra organized by the Registrar General’s Department where the reviewed Plant Breeders’ Bill is expected to be presented.
Food Sovereignty Ghana (FSG) only heard of it at the end of the first day! No formal invitation was extended, but were informed by a participant that the organisers say we were welcome. FSG has sent observers.
Stay tuned!

February 6, 2020
by admin
Comments Off

Ghana’s first GMO Court Case adjourned to February 18

Time: 1pm, at

Venue: Accra Human Rights Court, Court Room 2, Second Floor, The Law Courts Complex, John Evans Atta Mills High St, Accra: https://t.co/3SpShcmiAg?amp=1

SUIT NO. HRC/43/15: Food Sovereignty Ghana & 3 ors Vs National Biosafety Committee & 4 ors, against the commercialisation of genetically modified crops (GM crops) in Ghana.

February 1, 2020
by admin
Comments Off

Ghana’s first GMO Court Case adjourned to February 18

FSG Court Case1

Front row L-R Ras Zewu, Edwin Baffour, George Tetteh Wayoe, Samia Yaba Nkrumah, Bright Awketey.
Back row L-R Pascal Kudiabor (PFAG), Ras Aswad, Jonathan Welberg(Assistant to Bright)

January 20, 2020
by admin
Comments Off

Ghana’s GMO Court Case continues on 30th January 2020

The case involving the commercial release of the first batch of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in three crops in Ghana, is scheduled for hearing at the Accra Human Rights Court on Thursday, 30th January, 2020.

Food Sovereignty Ghana (FSG) and three others are suing the government of Ghana represented by the Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation, the Ministry of Food and Agriculture, the National Biosafety Authority and the Attorney-General’s Department.

It would be recalled that attempts to throw out this case in which one of the defendants sought to challenge a High Court ruling on the court’s jurisdiction to hear a petition brought before it, was rejected by the Supreme Court in a ruling which upheld the fact that the Human Rights High Court did have proper jurisdiction that it applied in ruling on the case brought before it by the four plaintiffs.

The hearing is expected to be one of case management and ensuring that all due processes have been properly filed for the substantive case to proceed. Among the witnesses representing FSG are two independent internationally recognised experts.

This comes at a time when a false narrative is being created in the minds of the Ghanaian public and the international community to create the impression that the government has abandoned the implementation of its policy to impose GMOs on Ghanaians.

The continuation of the case, in which the representatives of the government continue to defend the commercial release of Bt cowpeas, GM rice, as well as Bt cotton, clearly show that the recent utterances of the Minister of Food and Agriculture is nothing but a lot of hot air, possibly occasioned by the Harmattan season, or a deliberate attempt at deceiving Ghanaians for 2020 election. Whatever the motivations may be, it has the effect of fooling the people of Ghana into thinking that all is well, when the reality is far different.

Even though these GMO crops look exactly like their non-GMO counterparts, the scientists behind these experiments do not want them labelled. Apart from the fact that they fear people may not buy them if they are labelled, they also fear traceability and legal liability for any of the possible untoward consequences for consumers should anything happen to them after consumption of the GMO versions of these foods. FSG has long submitted its position paper on the labelling of food and feed containing GMO to the Food and Drugs Authority (FDA) and have maintained the position that Ghana should have a mandatory labelling regime and not a voluntary one as it seems regulators are considering.

A “former Principal Investigator at SARI and a consultant to the Bt cowpea project, was reported to have told the journalists, who also visited the site for the confined Bt cowpea trials at Nyankpala, that the Bt cowpea would not look different from the conventional ‘Songotra’ that farmers know already and are planting currently”. As at the time of going to court in 2015, the Bt cowpea had not been commercialised anywhere in the world. This was the first time that human beings were being expected to consume them. And Ghanaians had been chosen to be guinea pigs for this product without any known epidemiological studies on its effects human health. In Ghana, cowpeas are key ingredients in staple foods like waakye, gari and beans, ripe plantain and beans (also known as “red red”), etc. Therefore, the impact on the health of the population, as a result of the introduction of unlabelled Bt cowpeas in our food chain, could be devastating if care is not taken.


For Life, the Environment, and Social Justice!
Edwin Kweku Andoh Baffour
Communications Directorate, FSG
Contact: +233 207973808
E-mail : info@foodsovereigntyghana.org
Website: http://foodsovereigntyghana.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/FoodSovereignGH
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoodSovereigntyGhana

farmer images

December 6, 2019
by admin
Comments Off

Food Sovereignty Ghana Salutes All Farmers of the Nation!

Food Sovereignty Ghana (FSG) salutes all farmers of the nation on this 35th edition of Farmers Day. Indeed we acknowledge and recognise the unique contribution that farmers make to our daily lives and general welfare.

As a predominantly agrarian society the role of the farmer cannot be underestimated. We especially single out the efforts of the small holder farmers who continue to carry the burden of feeding the nation despite the myriads of challenges they face each day.

With the reality of climate change upon us, FSG wishes to repeat our call for a change in policy in our agriculture to adopt agroecology. This is the most sustainable form of food production for the planet and we fully agree with the United Nations Report on Sustainable d Development which recommends a dynamic shift away from commercial inspired agriculture with its increasingly great resource, harmful inputs, to an agroecological system that takes the well-being of the surrounding environment into consideration. It is instructive to note that as we celebrate this year’s Farmers Day, many farms no longer resemble what they looked like only one generation ago in terms of the organic flora and fauna that coexisted there. The critical role played by organisms such as earthworms and bees is increasingly under threat as the use of dangerous pesticides and herbicides is fast eroding their populations. Farmers no longer find mushrooms or snails on their farms.

Specifically it is important in our role as a civil society organisation working for social justice to highlight the extreme danger posed by our continued use of chemicals like Glyphosate in products such as Roundup, which are now officially considered to be carcinogenic. In a  landmark case in the USA a few months ago a court awarded a couple an unprecedented amount of two billion US dollars for compensation, where the dangerous chemical Glyphosate was found to have caused their cancer.  More worrying, is the court determined that the company Bayer Monsanto was fully aware of the injurious nature of this chemical despite their sustained efforts to promote it.

Indeed this must be a red flag for Ghanaians to realise that the agenda of the agribusiness lobby is to promote the sale of their controversial products despite their negative impact on human health and the environment.

The fact remains that four key areas continue to require the attention of key stakeholders, especially government. These are:
1.  The provision of credit to farmers;
2.  The construction of roads from farm gates to markets;
3. The provision of irrigation to increase yields;
4. The provision of post harvest technology to store produce safely and securely.

A greater attention to the challenges to farmers identified above would be a more productive use of resources, than the adoption of GMOs, which in our opinion, would be heavily misguided.

In order to have a sustainably productive agricultural industry it is of great importance for a national agenda to promote the consumption of locally grown food. While the government’s initiative of Planting for Food and Jobs is an admirable one, FSG calls for greater investment to create a local appetite and market for our produce. Greater political will is required to tackle the position that powerful lobbyists have assumed to influence policy against locally produced food.

We take the opportunity to thank all organisations working towards advancing the welfare of farmers across the nation and encourage Ghanaians, especially policymakers to recognize the important role of sustainability in planning for the industry.

Long Live Ghana’s Farmers!

Ayeekoo!

For Life, the Environment, and Social Justice!

Edwin Kweku Andoh Baffour
Communications Directorate, FSG

Contact: +233 207973808
E-mail : info@foodsovereigntyghana.org
Website: http://foodsovereigntyghana.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/FoodSovereignGH
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoodSovereigntyGhana

Front row L-R Ras Zewu, Edwin Baffour, George Tetteh Wayoe, Samia Yaba Nkrumah, Bright Awketey.
Back row L-R Pascal Kudiabor (PFAG), Ras Aswad, Jonathan Welberg(Assistant to Bright)

July 10, 2019
by admin
Comments Off

Supreme Court rules in favour of Food Sovereignty Ghana!

Front row L-R Ras Zewu, Edwin Baffour, George Tetteh Wayoe, Samia Yaba Nkrumah, Bright Awketey. Back row L-R Pascal Kudiabor (PFAG), Ras Aswad, Jonathan Welberg(Assistant to Bright)

Front row L-R Ras Zewu, Edwin Baffour, George Tetteh Wayoe, Samia Yaba Nkrumah, Bright Awketey.
Back row L-R Pascal Kudiabor (PFAG), Ras Aswad, Jonathan Welberg(Assistant to Bright)

Accra, July 9, 2019

Food Sovereignty Ghana (FSG) appeared before the Supreme Court today in a case in which one of the defendants sought to challenge a High Court ruling on the court’s jurisdiction to hear a petition brought before it by FSG and three others.

In a decision which did not take long to conclude, the highest court of the land ruled that the Human Rights High Court did have proper jurisdiction that it applied in ruling on the case brought before it by the four plaintiff parties.

The Supreme Court empaneled by five distinguished legal luminaries also wondered why the plaintiffs had not sought to appeal the High Court’s decision which they disagreed with, rather than invoking the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court.

It would be recalled that in the last appearance before the Human Rights High Court on June 7, Her Ladyship Justice Gifty Agyei Addo ruled in favour of FSG, that the jurisdiction of the Court was properly invoked to seek the reliefs sought by the plaintiffs given that the tribunal of the National Biosafety Authority (NBA) to which the defendants claimed should have been the proper body to hear such a case had not been properly constituted as required by law as of the time the case was first filed.

In his submission to the court, Counsel for the 1st , 3rd and 4th plaintiffs, George Tetteh Wayoe thanked the court for the decision and said the issue of introducing Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) into Ghana’s food chain had serious implications on the human rights of Ghanaians and thus a competent court of jurisdiction as the court had identified in the High Court’s ruling deserved to hear the case.

FSG hails the Supreme Court ruling as a significant and important victory over the local and international GM lobby that has been eager to flout our laws to introduce Bt cowpeas and GM rice with little or no epidemiological studies investigating the potential effects of their consumption on human health.

For example, the Bt cowpea has not yet been commercialized anywhere in the world. This is the first time that human beings are being expected to consume them. In Ghana, cowpeas are found in staple foods like waakye, garri and beans, ripe plantain and beans (also known as “red red”), etc., hence its impact on the health of the population could be devastating if care is not taken.

For us, the case is clearly a case of human health versus corporate profit. Already, Monsanto’s GM maize, event MON810, which contains the same Cry1Ab gene, and has been approved for human and animal consumption in many countries, has been found to have toxic effects in human liver cells during in vitro experiments exposing the protein produced by MON810 which contains the Cry1Ab gene.

We are particularly pleased that the case was not referred to the so-called GMO Tribunal but in a high court, where we hope to receive unbiased attention and judgement. FSG looks forward to vigorously contest the legal obligations of the National Biosafety Authority in terms of risk assessments, socio-economic impact assessments, as well as public awareness and participation at each stage of the decision-making process leading to the authorization of the confined field trials, which are all standard biosafety practice enshrined in law.

We take this opportunity on such an important milestone to repeat our call to the Food and Drugs Authority (FDA) to ensure that Ghana develops a mandatory labeling regime for any food or feed containing GMO based ingredients.

The case will continue in the Human Rights High Court on Thursday July 11th, as directed in the last sitting.

For Life, the Environment, and Social Justice!

Edwin Kweku Andoh Baffour
Communications Directorate, FSG

Contact: +233 207973808
E-mail : info@foodsovereigntyghana.org
Website: http://foodsovereigntyghana.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/FoodSovereignGH
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoodSovereigntyGhana

10857951_10205273280785952_7034759253788889226_n

July 6, 2019
by admin
Comments Off

GMO Case Goes To The Supreme Court

Ghana’s landmark GMO Court case in which Food Sovereignty Ghana (FSG) is suing the government of Ghana over the commercialization of genetically modified Bt cowpeas and GM rice goes to the Supreme Court on Tuesday, the 9th of July, 2019, at 9 am.

This follows a motion filed by one of the defendants invoking the superior jurisdiction of the Supreme Court in an order of certiorari directed at the Registrar of the Human Rights Court, for the purposes of quashing the ruling of the court dated 16th May, 2019 on the jurisdiction of the High Court to hear the case, Food Sovereignty Ghana & 3 Ors vs National Biosafety Committee & 4 Ors.

In the last appearance before the august court, Her Ladyship Justice Gifty Agyei Addo ruled in favour of FSG, that the jurisdiction of the Human Rights High Court was properly invoked to seek the reliefs sought by the plaintiffs given that the tribunal of the National Biosafety Authority (NBA) to which the defendants claimed should have been the proper body to hear such a case had not been properly constituted as required by law as of the time the case was first filed.

The defendants had raised issues dealing with the jurisdiction of the High Court to deliberate on case. They cited Section 26 of the Biosafety Act 831 which establishes a tribunal for resolving issues relating to bio-engineering technology. FSG prayed the court to focus on the illegalities committed by the NBA, which included the setting up of their Tribunal, for which we are seeking remedies. For example, at the time of going to court, the members of the Appeals Tribunal had not even been gazetted as required under Section 26 (2) which states clearly that, “The members of the Appeals Tribunal shall be appointed by the Minister and the appointments shall be published in the Gazette”.

The High Court ruling marked the second victory in a row against the defendants. The first one was an attempt to throw out the case in the Appeals Court on the grounds that the ruling on the interlocutory injunction against the intended release of BT Cowpea and GM Rice until the final determination of the suit, arguing that the court ruling had determined the entire case. This was thrown out by the Appeals Court. The second was challenging the jurisdiction of the court, which just saw the court ruling in favour of the plaintiffs. This is the case that has now been sent to the Supreme Court.

We are confident that the Highest Court in the land will appreciate the intention, meaning and purpose of the law as prescribed in our constitution to protect the interest of citizens where it may apply. It is the contention of FSG that what the Section 26 of the Act, which the defendants are using to challenge the jurisdiction of the court really shows, is yet another example of the several breeches of the Biosafety Act, for which we are already before the court. FSG is therefore praying the court to dismiss their petition, as these breaches clearly justify the jurisdiction of the Human Rights Court over the case.

For Life, the Environment, and Social Justice!

​Edwin Kweku Andoh Baffour
Communications Directorate, FSG

Contact: +233 207973808
E-mail : info@foodsovereigntyghana.org
Website: http://foodsovereigntyghana.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/FoodSovereignGH
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoodSovereigntyGhana

May 18, 2019
by admin
Comments Off

Solidarity with March Against Monsanto Accra Saturday 18th May

FSG Director of Communications, Mr. Edwin Baffour at the International Press Centre today, (Middle), flanked by Mr. evans Tawiah, Secretary, and Mr. Aswad Nkrabea, Director of Mobilization.

FSG Director of Communications, Mr. Edwin Baffour at the International Press Centre today, (Middle), flanked by Mr. evans Tawiah, Secretary, and Mr. Aswad Nkrabea, Director of Mobilization.

Solidarity with March Against Monsanto Accra Saturday 18th May

Good morning, Ladies and gentlemen of the press, friends and members of Food Sovereignty Ghana (FSG).  I would like to start by thanking you sincerely for honouring our invitation this morning.  I must also hasten to thank the members of the general public who have made time to attend. On behalf of FSG I thank Ghanaians for the overwhelming show of support following the court ruling on the jurisdiction of our case in the Human Rights High Court earlier this week. Our Facebook has been literally inundated with thousands of messages of support and congratulations. Ghanaians are clearly paying attention, and it is a shame that our politicians are not!

In respect of the annual ban on drumming and noise making within the Ga traditional area where Accra is located, this year we will avoid the challenges that arise from the temptation of our passionate participants to raise their voices while we ply through the approved route of our march.  We have thus decided to engage Ghanaians with our important message through a press conference instead.

Food Sovereignty Ghana stands today in solidarity with hundreds of cities and millions of people around the world against the unethical and destructive corporate practice of Bayer Monsanto.   This is the fifth consecutive year we have observed and supported this important event of global relevance and we continue.

March Against Monsanto, is an international grassroots movement against Monsanto Corporation, in protest at the company’s practices of using their affluence to influence the outcome of legislation, regulations, research findings, media narratives, etc. The movement was founded by Tami Canal in response to the failure of California’s Proposition 37, a ballot initiative which would have required labelling of food products made from GMOs. Monsanto was reported to have poured in $7,100,500 to help narrowly defeat California’s *Proposition 37.  On June 7, 2018 German pharmaceutical giant Bayer bought Monsanto for $63 Billion.

FSG has for the past six years been advocating against the introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in our agriculture and moved to the law courts in 2015 at the first announcement of plans to commercially release genetically modified cowpeas and rice on the Ghanaian market by government agencies. This position has not changed due to the amount of overwhelming evidence in independent research that clearly points to negative impacts on health and the environment of GMO despite the attempts to legitimize it by a strong and well-funded lobby.

We wish to recognize at this point the wide coalition of stakeholders who have aligned with our concerns about the introduction of GMO into our food system.  These include the Christian Council of Ghana, The Catholic Bishops Conference, The Ghana Muslim Mission, The Office of The Chief Imam, The Peasant Farmers Association of Ghana (PFAG), The Convention People’s Party (CPP), the Vegetarian Association of Ghana, the General Agricultural Workers Union (GAWU) of the Trade Union Congress, the Rastafari Council of Ghana, Center for Indigenous Knowledge and Organizational Development (CIKOD), and Food Span among others.  Posterity shall surely be kind to your principled position you have all taken in the interest of today’s children , the environment as well as future generations.

In the words of A. Samsel “We arguably, are faced with the most serious scientific fraud in the history of science and hazardous technologies. The multi-dimensional impacts of GMOs are staggering and they are global. These translate into a biosecurity threat of global proportions, a threat by “Monsanto and chemical companies, who continue to destroy the biosphere”

According to the Guardian newspaper of May 15, 2019, a landmark decision, by a California jury in the USA  awarded a record $2.055 Billion in damages and compensation to a couple after it was proven that the controversial products of Bayer Monsanto had caused their non- Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL).  This is a clear vindication of the position that FSG has held since its inception that the company due to its unethical corporate record should not be trusted.  Bayer Monsanto is the largest agrochemical entity globally and is the lead driver for countries especially developing ones like Ghana to adopt their GMO technology where the seeds have been engineered to tolerate these dangerous chemicals like glyphosate.

After all the sound research that has informed our position against GMO, as a responsible civil society organisation, we have no choice but to seek the endorsement of Ghanaian citizens to support a mandatory labelling regime for food made from GMOs.   Apart from countries like Argentina, India and Brazil, we also have the benefit of learning from our own neighbour Burkina Faso who recently experienced a five year disaster in growing GM cotton and has now resorted to conventional strains that are providing higher yields and debunking the myths peddled by the pro GMO lobby.  The documented resistance of the Boll worm to GM maize in the US and the pink boll worm to GM cotton in India respectively go to show the fact that such unintended risks associated with GMO’s should better inform our policy makers as early warning signs.  This puts into true context the efforts of organisations like the  Alliance For Science as well as the Open Forum for Agricultural Biotechnology (OFAB) who despite all these real facts are desperately trying to deceive Ghanaians that GMO would be of great benefit to Ghana.  The truth is Ghana’s agriculture is challenged by a lack of road infrastructure from farm gate to market, a lack of credit to farmers, lack of irrigation interventions and little post-harvest infrastructure to preserve the abundant harvests our farmers get.  The introduction of GMO’s will not address any of these critical concerns.

We support the call for labelling but since GMOs are yet to be cultivated in Ghana, we go beyond the call for labelling in demanding an indefinite moratorium on or a ban on all GM foods in Ghana! We take note of the debate going on at the Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) Ghana, to introduce voluntary labelling rather than mandatory labelling of GMOs, and reiterate our demand for mandatory labelling of everything GMO in the food chain of Ghanaians.    We are further encouraged by a recent ruling in the Human Rights High Court where Ghana’s first case concerning biotechnology is being heard.  This week the court ruled that FSG had properly invoked the jurisdiction of the High Court in seeking its remedies as submitted.

FSG is encouraged by studies such as the International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD), a project developed out of a consultative process involving 100 countries and more than 400 experts who come out clearly to play down any meaningful role biotechnology could play in meeting the food needs of our growing populations, and in the light of the challenges posed by climate change. The IAASTD was launched as an intergovernmental process, under the co-sponsorship of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO); the Global Environment Fund (GEF); the United Nations Development Program (UNDP); the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP); the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO); the World Bank and the World Health Organization (WHO).”

We continue our call on HE President Nana Akufo Addo and his government to reconsider Ghana’s agricultural agenda where genetically modified organism (GMO) seem to be in the plans.  It is extremely worrying that Ghana is losing sight of a clear opportunity that has presented itself for us which is the growing organic produce market around the world.  We enjoy a comparative advantage to exploit this market which is valued globally at $97 Billion as at 2017.  https://www.statista.com/statistics/273090/worldwide-sales-of-organic-foods-since-1999/ .

It is therefore critical to keep reminding our key stakeholders of the dangers of doing business with BayerMonsanto’s products embedded in our plans given the current legal precedence that is being set in the US where courts of competent jurisdiction have found Monsanto liable for the damages caused by its flagship product “Round Up” with its toxic and carcinogenic ingredient Glyphosate.  The question is can Ghanaians afford the legal proceedings to arrive such logical conclusions?

We repeat our call on the administration of H.E .Nana Akufo Addo to orientate government policy on agriculture towards what all the experts are saying: agroecology. The technology currently exists that is developing drought-resistant, pest resistant and high yielding crops through traditional breeding and selection. Marker Assisted Agro-ecological farming is not only inexpensive, and sustainable, it is far more successful than GM technology.

Agro ecological techniques are already safely and inexpensively producing crops with increasing yields plus tolerance and resistance to environmental stressors. We should forget GMOs and concentrate on agro ecological agriculture. The only reason why our “development partners” are opposed to this is because their multinational corporations shall lose the attempts to monopolize our food through GMO patents. They see our agricultural wealth as raw material to be extracted from Ghana in order to power their economic engine. We need to control and develop our agricultural wealth to power Ghana’s economic engine.

We again use this opportunity to repeat our call on policy makers to reconsider the UPOV-compliant Plant Breeders’ Bill, (PBB).  Over the years given we have through several press releases maintained that  the bill in its current form is too rigid, unsuitable, and illegitimate and there are still forces ignoring our call for a “sui generis’ plant protection system as required by the World Trade Organisation (WTO) to protect the intellectual property of plant breeders.  In concluding our consultations with the Parliamentary select Committee on Agriculture in 2018, it was agreed between the CSO’s and  the honourable panel that in the interest of the significant constituency of farmers all over Ghana, legislators needed to take another look at the Bill.  During that particular meeting we recall the cooperation we received from the Late Honourable Emmanuel Agyarko to have an honest review.

In November 2018 we were privilegded to address the Economic and Special Development Intitaives Committee of the Council of State.  Three out of six of the distinguished panel were in agreement with the position we presented and we are encouraged that Ghanaians at all levels of our society are giving us great support as they understand the real issues.

Ghana is at a cross roads and must make some very sound and well informed decisions.  Given the fact that we live in the age of information there is no excuse for a whole nation not be well informed from a policy, making perspective given the overwhelming evidence especially produced by independent researchers.  We are confident that given the past human rights record of H.E President Nana Akufo Addo, there is still hope where the welfare of Ghanaians is concerned.

#NOGMO4GH
– 

For Life, the Environment, and Social Justice!

​Edwin Kweku Andoh Baffour
Communications Directorate, FSG

Contact: +233 207973808
E-mail : info@foodsovereigntyghana.org
Website: http://foodsovereigntyghana.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/FoodSovereignGH
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoodSovereigntyGhana

 

 

Lawyer Bright Akwetey, second from right, flanked by some of the Executive Members of FSG, (from left to right) Messrs. Edwin Baffour, Raswad Nkrabea, and Ras Zewu, at the foregrounds of the Accra Human Rights Court.

May 16, 2019
by admin
Comments Off

VICTORY!!! Court Rules In Favour Of Food Sovereignty Ghana!

Accra, 15th May, 2019

Lawyer Bright Akwetey, second from right, flanked by some of the Executive Members of FSG, (from left to right) Mr. Edwin Baffour, Raswad Nkrabea, and Ras Zewu, at the foregrounds of the Accra Human Rights Court.

Lawyer Bright Akwetey, second from right, flanked by some of the Executive Members of FSG, (from left to right) Messrs. Edwin Baffour, Raswad Nkrabea, and Ras Zewu, at the foregrounds of the Accra Human Rights Court.

The Accra Human Rights Court has thrown out an objection challenging the jurisdiction of the court to try the case involving the authorisation of confined field trials of the first GM crops in Ghana, ruling in favour of FSG.

This is the second victory in a row. It would be recalled that the defendants, after failing to throw out the case in the Appeals Court on the grounds that the ruling on the interlocutory injunction against the intended realise of BT Cowpea and GM Rice until the final determination of the suit, arguing that the court ruling had determined the entire case.

This time, the defendants had raised issues dealing with the jurisdiction of the High Court to deliberate on case, Food Sovereignty Ghana & 3 ors Vs National Biosafety Committee & 4 ors, against the commercialisation of genetically modified crops (GM crops) in Ghana. They cited Section 26 of the Biosafety Act 831 which establishes a tribunal for resolving issues relating to bio-engineering and technology.

In her ruling the judge upheld the right of FSG to seek appropriate remedies from the Human Rights Court, insisting that the FSG suit is not pre-mature as the jurisdiction of the court has been properly invoked. More details shall be made available soon.

The court shall sit again on June 7 2019.

FSG shall hold a press conference at the Ghana International Press Centre at Ridge at 10 am on Saturday morning May 18.